School Library Research


School Library Research (ISSN: 2165-1019) is the scholarly refereed research journal of the American Association of School Librarians. It is the successor to School Library Media Research (ISSN: 1523-4320) and School Library Media Quarterly Online.

The purpose of School Library Research is to promote and publish high quality original research concerning the management, implementation, and evaluation of school library programs. The journal will also emphasize research on instructional theory, teaching methods, and critical issues relevant to school libraries and school librarians.

SLR seeks to distribute major research findings worldwide through both electronic publication and linkages to substantive documents on the Internet. The primary audience for SLR includes academic scholars, school librarians, instructional specialists and other educators who strive to provide a constructive learning environment for all students and teachers.

SLR is indexed by The Education Full Text Database by EBSCO/Wilson and by the The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC).

All material in SLR is subject to copyright by ALA and may be reproduced only for the noncommercial purpose of educational or scientific advancement.


Sessions

Social Media to Survive and Thrive: School Librarians Describe Online Professional Learning

School librarians balance leadership and instruction in a fluid role that is highly influenced by education trends such as innovation, budget cuts, and distance learning. Prior research found these professionals remain relevant by learning through social media. This exploratory project inquired about the activities, motives, and barriers associated with social media learning. The questionnaire results were dissected by media type (self-published content, curated content, microblogs, discussion forums, and social networks) and by user role (Passerby, Lurker, Networker, Content Creator, and Community Leader). The results showed participants used all five media types and most frequently identified as Lurkers. Although participants most frequently engaged in passive behaviors, participants who self-identified as having active roles were associated with active behaviors. Broadly, participants agreed with motives found in the literature but disagreed with barriers. Distinctions were found when the three question sets (activities, motives, barriers) were dissected by media type and user role. The results can guide individual users as they initiate or expand their social media use and can support leaders as they develop the school librarian community.

Author(s):
  • Michelle Cates, Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies, Florida State University
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Enabling Collaboration through Mentorship: Examining the Role of the School Librarian

Mentoring of new teachers by school librarians to build resilience in those teachers creates a pathway to foster collaboration. This study is a follow-up to an American Association of School Librarians CLASS II: Field Study in which fifteen school librarians implemented interventions under the Continuum of Care model for new teachers to increase teachers’ resilience. After the close of the field study, the school librarians completed a survey to examine their perceptions of the model for assessment of need, program theory, program process, impact, and efficiency. The survey developed for this program study consisted of twenty Likert-type items on five subscales, a checklist, and three open-ended questions. Scaled responses were analyzed using SPSS Statistics for descriptive statistics, and qualitative responses were coded using NVivo software. Responses demonstrate overall success of the model, with some changes indicated for efficiency. Common additional duties assigned to school librarians are identified as well as barriers and enablers for implementing the Continuum of Care model. Results further define the relationship between new teachers and school librarians using mentoring to develop collaborative partnerships.

Author(s):
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Enabling School Librarians to Serve as Instructional Leaders of Multiple Literacies

This case study was conducted to explore how school district leaders can foster the development of effective school libraries in which school librarians serve as instructional leaders of multiple literacies. Participants included district-level personnel and building-level school librarians. The district-level personnel consisted of those who held leadership roles in areas related to the school library program: teaching and learning, assessment, professional development, and instructional technology. Data were collected from multiple sources, including interviews, focus groups, documents, and observations. An exploratory method of coding was employed to organize the data into categories from which three themes emerged: ambiguous expectations, ability to fully engage with the instructional program, and relationships. Results revealed two main barriers that inhibit the development of an effective school library: a) ambiguous administrative expectations for school librarians, and b) school librarians’ limited participation in the K–12 instructional program. Conversely, results demonstrated that positive relationships serve as significant supports for enabling school librarians to function as instructional leaders of multiple literacies.

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A Content Analysis of District School Library Selection Policies in the United States

Selection policies are practical tools used by school librarians to guide them in their collection development plans. This investigation into district-level selection policies examined policies from 80 school districts across the United States. The policies were examined to determine the status of selection policies in school libraries and if the policies reflect the recommendations of professional literature. Through content analysis, we determined that most of the school library selection policies included at least half of the expected key components. However, there is a need for school librarians to advocate for revision of policies to keep them current and provide effective guidance for school librarians as they make selections for their collections.

Author(s):
Tags: SLR
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Take Action: A Content Analysis of Administrators’ Understandings of and Advocacy for the Roles and Responsibilities of School Librarians

The dissemination and adoption of new standards is of primary concern to national education associations, the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) among them. The purpose of this content-analysis study was to investigate the impact of the National School Library Standards for Learners, School Librarians, and School Libraries (AASL 2018) on the School Leader Collaborative members’ understandings of and advocacy for the roles and responsibilities of school librarians. These members were all public school administrators. The researchers used documents co-developed by AASL and the Collaborative to create a category matrix to analyze the content of primary and secondary source videos. The results of the study show the extent to which these exemplary administrators value leadership and other responsibilities of school librarians. Their perspectives offer practicing and preservice school librarians specific expectations to elevate the practice of school librarianship and improve library services for all library stakeholders.

Author(s):
  • Pamela Harland, Library Media and Digital Learning Specialist MEd Program Director, Plymouth State University
  • Judi Moreillon, Author & Researcher, Story Power
  • Anita Cellucci, School Librarian & K-12 Department Head, Westborough High School
Tags: Free SLR
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